22 February 2014

Remove Gallstones Naturally

Did you know that nearly 1 million gallbladders are removed yearly?
Over 20 years ago, gallbladders were removed surgically and the recovery period was slow and painful.  The traditional “open” gallbladder surgery has almost completely been replaced with the introduction of laparoscopy. Laparoscopy uses small instruments and a lighted tube equipped with a video camera, all inserted through tiny abdominal incisions. The recovery period is quicker and less painful with a laparoscopy making it the preferred method of removal.
Unfortunately, the number of gallbladder operations has risen 40 percent since the introduction of the laparoscopy! Perhaps the doctors would prefer to avoid severe attacks so, the gallbladder is removed with vague symptoms like bloating and gas. This equals unnecessary surgery!
Laporascopic removal of the gallbladder while used commonly is not without risk. Accidental severing of the bile duct, which can cause permanent liver damage, occurs in 1 to 2 percent of laparoscopies—three times more often than in open surgery!

Function of the Gallbladder:

The gallbladder is located just under the liver and has a very important role in the digestive process.
According to Wikipedia:
In vertebrates the gallbladder (cholecystgall bladderbiliary vesicle) is a small organ that aids mainly in fat digestion and concentrates bile produced by the liver. The surgical removal of the gallbladder is called a cholecystectomy.
To put it another way, it emulsifies fats. Think of trying to wash greasy dishes without soap. It is almost impossible. Why? Because soap emulsifies the grease. Similarly, the gallbladder stores bile and bile acids, which emulsify the fat eaten so it can be properly transported through the intestine into the blood stream.
Bile is made in the liver, then stored in the gallbladder until the body needs it to digest fat. At that time, the gallbladder contracts and pushes the bile into a tube–called the common bile duct–that carries it to the small intestine, where it helps with digestion. Under certain conditions the bile can harden into stones.

Types of Gallstones:

There are two two types of gallstones:
1. Cholesterol stones made up of hardened cholesterol are usually yellow-green. 80 percent of gallstones are cholesterol stones. They are caused by too much cholesterol, bilirubin, or not enough bile salts or when the gallbladder does not empty as it should.
2. Pigment stones made of bilirubin are small, dark stones. Their cause is uncertain although they tend to occur in people with cirrhosis, biliary tract infections, and hereditary blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia – these conditions cause too much bilirubin to form.
Either type of gallstones can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball. The gallbladder can develop either one large stone, hundreds of tiny stones, or almost any combination.

Symptoms of a Gallbladder Attack:

If gallstones lodge in any of the ducts that carry bile from the liver to the small intestines, a gallbladder attack occurs. Symptoms have a rapid onset and may include:
  • Steady pain in the upper abdomen that increases rapidly and lasts from 30 minutes to several hours
  • Pain in the back between the shoulder blades
  • Pain under the right shoulder
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal bloating
  • Recurring intolerance of fatty foods
  • Belching
  • Gas
  • Indigestion
An easy way to determine if your pain is related to the gallbladder is to press down below on your last rib on your right side and lined up with your nipple – if there is pain there is a good chance that you have a gallbladder problem.

Curing Symptoms Not the Problem:

The removal of the gallbladder is a procedure called Cholecystectomy. Of the 1 million cholecystectomys or gallbladder removals that are done yearly, it is estimated that only a few thousand actually need to come out! Sadly, as many as half of the patients continue to have pain after the gallbladder is removed. Rather than treat the symptoms, more care should be taken to heed the warning signals and determine why the gallbladder is not functioning properly.
One way to relieve congestion in the gallbladder is a gallbladder cleanse or flush.
Source: http://myculturedpalate.com/blog/2013/01/02/gallbladder-cleanse-an-alternative-to-surgery/
Chiu Nan offers the following method to remove them naturally. 
The treatment is also good for those with a weak liver, because the liver and gallbladder are closely linked. 

1. For the first five days, take four glasses of apple juice every day. Or eat four or five apples, whichever you prefer. Apple juice softens the gallstones. During the five days, eat normally. 
2. On the sixth day, take no dinner. 
3. At 6 PM, take a teaspoon of Epsom salt (magnesium sulphate) with a glass of warm water. 
4. At 8 PM, repeat the same. Magnesium sulphate opens the gallbladder ducts. 
5. At 10 PM, take half cup olive oil (or sesame oil) with half cup fresh lemon juice. Mix it well and drink it. The oil lubricates the stones to ease their passage. 

The next morning, you will find green stones in your stools. "Usually they float," Chiu Nan notes. "You might want to count them. I have had people who passes 40, 50 or up to 100 stones. Very many." 

"Even if you don't have any symptoms of gallstones, you still might have some. It's always good to give your gall bladder a clean-up now and then. 

Source: http://abchomeopathy.com/forum2.php/118996/ 

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